home remedies for pinched nerve in neck

(Last Updated On: 2019-09-13)

What is pinched nerve ?

A pinched nerve is a compressed or damaged nerve. It develops when a nerve root is inflamed or injured. The nerve root is the part where a nerve branches off from the spinal cord. It’s possible to get a pinched nerve in different parts of the spine, such as your neck, or thoracic or lumbar spine.

A pinched nerve in the neck can cause radiculopathy. Symptoms of radiculopathy may include numbness, tingling, fatigue, and pain into the arm. Pinched nerves affect approximately 85 out of each 100,000 adultsTrusted Source in the United States each year. In early middle-aged adults, it is usually brought on by a herniated disc. This occurs when one of those soft discs between the vertebrae of your spine slips outside and irritates nerves that are nearby. It might be the consequence of sudden lifting, twisting, or bending.

Pinched nerves are most common in people aged 50 to 54. In middle-aged individuals and elderly adults, it is often caused by age-related degeneration of the spine. Bone growths can also compress the nerves. A pinched nerve in the neck may feel like pins and needles. It may also result in weakness and pain in the shoulder, arm, or hand.

Severe cases need medical care. But if your symptoms are mild, it is possible to try exercises to get a pinched nerve in the throat.

Stretching and yoga

Gentle stretching and yoga may help relieve tension and pressure in the area. It’s important not to stretch too intensely, as this may make symptoms worse. If a person experiences any discomfort or pain while exercising, they ought to stop immediately to prevent damaging the nerve-wracking any further.[1]

Ice and heat packs

Alternating between ice and heat packs may help reduce swelling and inflammation oftentimes. The mix of cold and hot increases the circulation of new blood to the surface, which might help alleviate pain.[2]

Hold an ice pack over the affected area for approximately 15 minutes at a time, three times a day to help reduce inflammation. Heat pads may be implemented for a longer period up to 1 hour, three times every day.

Massage or physical therapy

Having a massage can also help reduce physical pain and stress. Applying gentle pressure around the affected area may help relieve tension, and a full body massage can help the muscles relax. Deep tissue massages may not be a good idea since the excess pressure may cause the symptoms worse. Physical therapy, using a combination of massage, exercise, and gentle stretches, help relieve symptoms.

Take Additional sleep

Sleep is essential for a healing nerve. The body repairs itself during sleep, thus giving it additional time to do this may help reduce symptoms faster. Oftentimes, resting on the affected area and receiving extra sleep is sufficient to permit the pinched nerve to heal on its own.

While treating a pinched nerve, it’s also important to not overuse the nervewracking. Nerve damage can be made worse. A person who has a pinched nerve must avoid any movements that irritate the nerve. They should also attempt to maneuver at a position that alleviates the pressure on the nerve.

Splint

When it is possible, sporting a splint on the affected area can help prevent further damage and help the nerve cure. This is a normal treatment for pinched nerves in the wrists and hands.

Many individuals also sleep with the splint to avoid any aggravation in the night and help them sleep.

Elevate the legs

People with pinched nerves at the trunk may find relief from elevating their legs to remove any pressure from the backbone.

A person can achieve this by placing a few cushions under their knees, so their legs are at a 45° degree angle to the body.

Lifestyle changes

In the long-term, including a low-impact exercise, such as walking, swimming, or bicycling, to your daily regimen may help reduce symptoms and keep the body fit. Losing extra weight can help lower pressure on the nerves, and also the additional freedom from a regular workout can reduce inflammation.

Stretching before or after low-impact exercises might help keep the body flexible and decrease pressure and inflammation close to the nerves.

Massage or physical therapy

Having a massage can also help reduce physical pain and stress. Applying gentle pressure around the affected area may help relieve tension, and a full body massage can help the muscles relax. Deep tissue massages may not be a good idea since the excess pressure may cause the symptoms worse.

Physical therapy, using a combination of massage, exercise, and gentle stretches, help relieve symptoms.

Change of posture

Sitting or standing having a wrong posture for prolonged periods puts unneeded pressure on the entire body, which may damage the spine and muscles, resulting in a pinched nerve.

Using cushions, adjustable seats, and neck naps when sitting can help relieve pressure and allow the nerve to heal.

Ergonomic workstation

Individuals dealing with pinched nerves could try making modifications in their workstation. Using an ergonomic mouse and keyboard might help reduce pressure from the palms and wrists. Raising a computer monitor to eye level might help reduce neck pain and symptoms of text neck. Employing a standing workstation can keep the backbone flexible and moving, which might reduce back pain.

Ergonomic workstations possess a range of positional options, suitable for all types of pinched nerve. Standing desks are offered for purchase online. The best approach to find the right position is for an individual to experiment with all the settings to see which place relieves pressure.

Chin tuck

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